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  • AI agents can learn to communicate effectively

    [15 Jul 2020] A multi-disciplinary team of researchers from Chalmers and University of Gothenburg has developed a framework to study how language evolves as an effective tool for describing mental concepts. In a new paper, they show that artificial agents can learn how to communicate in an artificial language similar to human language. The results have been published in the scientific journal PLOS ONE.

  • Medicine against prostate cancer in new COVID-19 study

    [15 Jul 2020] In a new trial, Swedish researchers will investigate if a medicine normally used to treat prostate cancer can also be used to treat COVID-19 in patients. The desired effect is that the medicine will shorten the course of the disease and the need for intensive care. The drug itself is known to not least affect an enzyme important in prostate cancer cases and in corona infections.

  • Better hip replacements when surgeon operates often

    [14 Jul 2020] The higher the proportion of primary hip replacement operations a surgeon performs annually, the better the results are, a thesis at the University of Gothenburg shows. On the other hand, it makes little difference to the patient whether the operating surgeon is a fully trained specialist in orthopedics or a resident physician being trained as an orthopedic specialist.

  • An ambitious climate policy is economically beneficial

    [13 Jul 2020] An economically optimal climate policy is in line with the Paris Agreement's 2-degree temperature target. This is according to a new study involving the University of Gothenburg, Chalmers University of Technology and others. The study updates the cost/benefit analyses of climate measures made by Economics Laureate William Nordhaus.

  • Gut microbiota provide clues for treating diabetes

    [13 Jul 2020] The individual mix of microorganisms in the human gastrointestinal tract provides vital clues as to how any future incidence of type 2 diabetes can be predicted, prevented and treated. This is demonstrated in a population study led from the University of Gothenburg.

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